• Facebook Social Icon
  • LinkedIn Social Icon

                                © 2016 Lawrence & Gerges, LLC. 

Serving Northern New Jersey and New York including Elizabeth, Newark, Rahway, Linden, Irvington, East Orange, Orange, West Orange, Union, Hillside, North Plainfield, Plainfield, Springfield, Cranford, Westfield, Scotch Plains, Roselle, Roselle Park, Kenilworth, Montclair, Livingston, Short Hills, South Orange, Maplewood, Roseland, Union City, Jersey City, Nutley, Clifton, Belleville, Kearny, Union County, Essex County, Hudson County, Bergen County, Middlesex County, Morris County, Passaic County, Sussex County, New York City, Brooklyn, Bronx, Staten Island, Queens and Manhattan.

 

Proud supporters of 

Severance Negotiations in New Jersey

Severance Agreements. One way employers try avoid lawsuits from employees who have been wrongfully terminated is to offer employees severance agreements. Typically an employer will offer “severance pay” or benefits if the employee agrees to give up any claim he or she has against the employer. When this happens, the employee faces a difficult decision.

If your employer has presented you with a severance agreement, you have to decide whether the pay or benefits your employer is offering is enough to make it worthwhile for you to give up your right to sue for wrongful termination.  To make this decision, you need to know if you have a wrongful termination claim, how strong your claim is, and what it might be worth.

Free Severance Agreement Review. At Lawrence & Gerges, we offer free severance agreement review.  We will discuss with you what exactly your employer is asking you to agree to and what kinds of claims you might be giving up if you agree at a free consultation at our New Jersey Offices.  Chances are your employer had lawyers draw up the agreement.  It only makes sense for you to get advice from an experienced employment lawyer before you sign.

Contingent Fee Severance Negotiations. If we think your employer is asking you to give up a valid wrongful termination claim, and the money they are offering is not enough, we may be willing to try to negotiate with your employer for additional severance pay on a contingent fee basis.  A contingent fee means that we will not ask you to pay a fee up front, but will be paid only if and when we are able to negotiate additional pay for you.

Of course if you have a valid wrongful discharge claim against your employer, and your employer is not willing to pay enough for you to give up your claim, you may have the right to sue.  The lawyers at Lawrence & Gerges have successfully handled hundreds of wrongful discharge claims and have the experience to advise you as to whether your claim has a realistic chance of success. Moreover, if you retain us to represent you in a claim, our trial team has the skill and experience to represent you all the way through trial against any employer, no matter how big.